History of Cialis

Cialis is the branded version of the drug Tadalafil, which is an inhibitor drug that is used to control the release of cGMP in the body. This is the hormone that is responsible for causing erectile dysfunction.

Cialis is an effective drug and one that many have been prescribed and have used in order to help with their erectile dysfunction and to live happier lives. With a prescription to Cialis, many are able to purchase the drug online or through a pharmacy and get the help that they need for their condition.

But where does Cialis come from, and how did it come about to be one of the main erectile dysfunction drugs on the market? There is a lot more to the history of Cialis and the history of erectile dysfunction as a whole than one might think, because erectile dysfunction is a problem that has plagued men throughout history. Here is a little more on the history of Cialis:

The History of Erectile Dysfunction

People throughout history have worked to treat erectile dysfunction in a number of different ways. One of the first groups of people to attempt to use a drug to treat erectile dysfunction were the Islamic people in medieval times. Islamic pharmacists and physicians had a number of drugs as well a dietary restrictions and suggestions that they recommended to their patients who suffered from erectile dysfunction. In addition to oral medications, they also prescribed topical creams to their patients.

Throughout history, there were a large number of different attempts to cure erectile dysfunction that turned out to be ineffective. Doctors and physicians tried topical ointments, oral pills, and even implants and injections in order to help those with erectile dysfunction. Some doctors, such as Dr. John R Brinkley were disbarred due to their unethical methods of treating erectile dysfunction. However, it wasn’t until 1989 that erectile dysfunction medications as we know them today came to be.

Treatment of erectile dysfunction was revolutionised in 1989 with the discovery of the drug Sildenafil, which would later be branded under the name Viagra. This was due to Pfizer employees, Albert Wood and Peter Dunn, who synthesised the drug with the help of their co-workers at a research facility in England.

Surprisingly, in the case of Viagra, the drug was not initially being tested as a cure for erectile dysfunction, but more so that the cure for erectile dysfunction was a happy accident that was found in the search for a better heart medicine with the testing of PDE5 enzyme inhibitors.

Sildenafil was, and still is, used as a heart medication as well as the main active ingredient in Viagra. Wood and Dunn were the ones responsible for bringing Viagra to the market in pill form.

Although Viagra was the first option on the market, a few other good options such as Cialis would soon crop up, and people across the world would finally find themselves with a solution for their erectile dysfunction.

The History of Cialis

In March of 1998, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the drug Viagra for public use, and for the next five years, Viagra was considered to be the only drug with which to treat erectile dysfunction. Pfizer and their drug had a monopoly on the industry, but the use of Viagra was limited to those who were able to take the drug Sildenafil without having adverse effects. This was when other companies began their search for drugs that would act in the way that Sildenafil did in order to tap into the lucrative market that Viagra had created.

The trials for Cialis began in 1991, with the companies ICOS and GlaxoSmithKline working together in order to find an inhibitor drug that would work in the same way that Sildenafil did. They discovered Tadalafil and continued to work to develop the compound together until 1997 when the companies broke up, and ICOS continued their research alone.

The Phase I clinical tests of Tadalafil as a treatment for erectile dysfunction began in 1995, and the Phase II testing began in 1997 with clinical studies. Between 1998 and 2002, ICOS partnered with Eli Lilly and Company to further the development of Tadalafil as a drug used to help those who were suffering from erectile dysfunction.

In 2002, in an effort to prove the effects of Tadalafil as a treatment for those who suffer from erectile dysfunction, Eli Lilly and Company met with the American Urological Association to prove the legitimacy of Tadalafil in Phase III testing. Their studies and clinical testing proved that Tadalafil worked as a drug treatment for erectile dysfunction and stayed active in the system for 36 hours.

In 2000, Eli Lilly and Company applied to have the drug Tadalafil branded under the name by which we now know it: Cialis. Then, in 2002, the drug was approved for wide usage throughout Europe. In 2003, the FDA approved the use of Cialis as a drug to help people suffering from erectile dysfunction, and the drug hit the mainstream market to great success.

Following the success of Tadalafil as a drug used for erectile dysfunction, the drug began being used for conditions such as prostatic hyperplasia. Since then, Cialis is one of the top drugs used to cure erectile dysfunction and continues to be useful for other conditions to this day.

Conclusion

Erectile dysfunction is an issue that has been around for as long as humans have been around, and it took until the advancement of modern medicine for scientists to find a treatment for the problem that truly worked. There were a lot of bumps along the way, with scientists as recent as 1989 swinging and missing at the treatment for erectile dysfunction, but the scientists that discovered Viagra as a viable treatment paved the way for those who invented Cialis to find theirs.

Since its discovery, Cialis has been proven to be a viable method to treat erectile dysfunction so that those who suffer from it can instead live normal, happy, and healthy lives.

About Andrew JenkinsonMr. Andrew Jenkinson is a general surgeon in Harley Street, London specialising in Bariatric and Laparoscopic procedures. His interests include surgery for weight loss and diabetes, acid reflux disease, gallstones, hernia repair and surgical emergencies. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons and holds a Master of Surgery title for his research thesis. He is a member of the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society, the International Federation of Surgery for Obesity, the Association of Upper GI Surgeons and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.Andrew Jenkinson Facebook Andrew Jenkinson Google Plus Andrew Jenkinson Twitter Andrew Jenkinson Medium Andrew Jenkinson Wordpress Andrew Jenkinson Blogger